Youth Conservation Service Award

Scouts BSA Requirements

  1. Earn the First Class Rank
  2. Earn the following five Merit Badges:
    • Environmental Science
    • Fish and Wildlife Management
    • Forestry
    • Soil and Water Conservation
    • Sustainability
  3. Earn any two of the following Merit Badges:
    • Bird Study
    • Energy
    • Fishing
    • Fly‐Fishing
    • Gardening
    • Geology
    • Insect Study
    • Landscape Architecture
    • Mammal Study
    • Nature
    • Nuclear Science
    • Oceanography
    • Plant Science
    • Pulp and Paper
    • Reptile and Amphibian Study
    • Weather
  4. Plan, lead, and carry out two conservation projects from two different categories. (The projects must be developed under the guidance and pre‐approval of the Scout’s Unit Leader, a BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award Adviser, and the Council Conservation Committee.) One of the projects may include the Scout’s Eagle Scout project, if applicable. The categories include:

    • Air and Water Pollution Control
    • Energy Conservation
    • Fish & Wildlife Management
    • Forestry & Range Management
    • Hazardous Materials Disposal and Management
    • Invasive Species Control
    • Pollinator Management
    • Resource Recovery
    • Soil & Water Conservation
  5. Successfully pass a board of review conducted by the GGAC’s Conservation Committee (STEM Committee in this case.)

Venturer & Sea Scout Requirements

  1. Plan, lead, and carry out two conservation projects from two different categories. The projects must be developed under the guidance of and pre‐approval by the applicants Unit Leader, a BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award Adviser, and the Council Conservation Committee. One of the projects may include the Scout’s Eagle Scout project (if applicable). The categories include:
    • Air and Water Pollution Control
    • Energy Conservation
    • Fish & Wildlife Management
    • Forestry & Range Management
    • Hazardous Materials Disposal and Management
    • Invasive Species Control
    • Pollinator Management
    • Resource Recovery
    • Soil & Water Conservation
  2. Do 2 (a) and (b)
    • a. Make a tabletop display or presentation on one of your conservation projects for a crew, ship, post, a Cub Scout, or Scouts BSA group, or another group.
    • b. Submit an article about your project to a local newspaper, radio station, your school newspaper, internet publication, or TV station.
  3. Lead a Cub Scout or Scouts BSA group in carrying out an age-appropriate conservation project from a BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award project category (see list in requirement 1 above).
  4. Write a paper or make a presentation on a plant or wildlife species. Include its value as seen from various perspectives, some of the problems various species face, and how we might be able to help.
  5. Do both 5(a) and (b).
    • (a) Select an area approved by your BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award Adviser that contains several species of wildlife or plants. Observe this area thoroughly in various conditions and seasons of the year. Study the history of this area, paying attention to how it has changed over time, ownership, land use patterns, and landform and climate change
    • (b) Make a presentation on interaction between species; the reaction of various species to changes in conditions or outside influences; the degree to which this area provides food, shelter, materials, and protection for each species; population trends; your predictions on the future of these species; suggested actions to protect or enhance the populations; and the investigation methods that you used.
  6. Do 6(a) and (b).
    • (a) Study a specific plant or wildlife species approved by your Adviser that can be found in several different areas. Observe this species thoroughly in various areas and seasons of the year. Study the history of this species paying attention to how it has adapted over time.
    • (b) Make a presentation on this species; any reactions to changes in conditions or outside influences; this species’ needs for food, soil, shelter, materials, protection, assistance with propagation, etc.; population trends; your prediction for the future of this species; suggested actions to protect or enhance the population; and the investigation methods you used.
  7. Explain the basic natural systems, cycles, and changes over time and how they are evidenced in a watershed near to where you live. Include the four basic elements, land use patterns, and at least six different species in your analysis and how they have changed over time. Discuss both biological and physical components.
  8. Describe at least four environmental study areas near where you live. Include the reasons for selecting these areas, their boundaries, user groups, past inventories, any outside forces that interact with them, and a list of what things could be studied at each of them.
  9. Plan a field trip to each of the above areas, including detailed plans for consolidating various investigations. Follow all the requirements such as landowner permissions and/or needed permits, safety plans, transportation plans, equipment needs, etc.
  10. Do 10(a) and (b).
    • (a) Under the guidance of a natural resource professional, carry out an investigation of an ecological subject approved by your BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award Adviser in one of the areas selected above. Inventory and map the area. Conduct a detailed investigation providing specific data for a specific topic.
    • (b) Document and present your findings to a crew, ship, post, pack, troop, or another group.
  11. Teach others in a crew, ship, post, pack, troop, or another group how to carry out an ecological investigation. Use steps 9 and 10 above with the group so that they may also learn by doing.
  12. Successfully pass a board of review conducted by the local Council’s Conservation Committee

Venturing

Sea Scouts

Exploring

International

Highlander

Shooting Sport

STEM

Scouting for Food

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